A teacher shared an amazing activity that explains Politics and Economics

An ex-teacher Caoimhe O’Connell has shared an amazing activity that she conducted with the students of class one, which includes making random groups, getting random resources, and making goods by using those resources that can make an impact on the country economies and politics

Blackboard, Boys, Chalkboard, Children, Classroom, Desk

She posted the entire activity on a Twitter thread. Read the story below:

Former Teacher Shares Genius Game That Teaches Kids Politics And Economics
Former Teacher Shares Genius Game That Teaches Kids Politics And Economics
Former Teacher Shares Genius Game That Teaches Kids Politics And Economics
Former Teacher Shares Genius Game That Teaches Kids Politics And Economics
Former Teacher Shares Genius Game That Teaches Kids Politics And Economics
Former Teacher Shares Genius Game That Teaches Kids Politics And Economics
Former Teacher Shares Genius Game That Teaches Kids Politics And Economics
Former Teacher Shares Genius Game That Teaches Kids Politics And Economics
Former Teacher Shares Genius Game That Teaches Kids Politics And Economics
Former Teacher Shares Genius Game That Teaches Kids Politics And Economics
Former Teacher Shares Genius Game That Teaches Kids Politics And Economics
Former Teacher Shares Genius Game That Teaches Kids Politics And Economics
Former Teacher Shares Genius Game That Teaches Kids Politics And Economics
Former Teacher Shares Genius Game That Teaches Kids Politics And Economics
Former Teacher Shares Genius Game That Teaches Kids Politics And Economics
Former Teacher Shares Genius Game That Teaches Kids Politics And Economics
Former Teacher Shares Genius Game That Teaches Kids Politics And Economics
Former Teacher Shares Genius Game That Teaches Kids Politics And Economics

She also posted that thing on her Imgur as well. Several people reacted to her tweets and gave their remarks:

One said: Great! I played a similar game once as a language lesson, so lots of swapping and bartering and sudden change. But there was no ethic lessons, just Irish

A second one added: I had a sociology high school teacher who did a similar game but we were individuals instead of countries as an introduction to class division. It has stayed with me to this day (40 years later). It explained so much of how the rich, middle and poor respond and behave.

A third one said: I made a free game to do similar–teach the systemic nature of poverty and offer students a way to learn about politics and microeconomics. One table abolished money and created what they termed a “feminist utopian poetry collective” where if you owe, you pay in haiku.

What do you think about this game? Let us know in the comments

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